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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces lineup for Open Roads: New Italian Cinema

Daniele Luchetti's "Anni Felici"

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE OPENING NIGHT SELECTION OF DANIELE LUCHETTI’S THOSE HAPPY YEARS AND VENICE FILM FESTIVAL PRIZEWINNER GIANFRANCO ROSI’S SACRO GRA AND ROME FILM FESTIVAL PRIZEWINNER ALBERTO FASULO’S TIR

IN-PERSON APPEARANCES BY DIRECTORS DANIELE LUCHETTI, ROBERTO ANDÒ, PIERFRANCESCO DILIBERTO, ALBERTO FASULO, GIANFRANCO ROSI, ALESSANDRO ROSSETTO, GIOVANNA VERONESI, EDOARDO WINSPEARE, AND ACTRESS VALERIA SOLARINO

New York, NY (April, 8, 2014) –The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today the lineup for Open Roads: New Italian Cinema, which will take place from June 5-12, 2014. Open Roads has served as the leading North American showcase of contemporary Italian cinema for the past 13 years. This exceptionally strong and diverse edition includes the latest work from established veterans (Gianni Amelio, Roberto Andò, Daniele Luchetti) and top award winners, alongside promising new talents from both the commercial and independent spheres, with in-person appearances at many screenings.

“We are pleased to welcome some familiar faces back to Open Roads—including Daniele Luchetti for Opening Night and Gianni Amelio with his two latest films—and also to introduce so many promising emerging filmmakers,” says the Film Society’s Director of Programming Dennis Lim. “This year’s rich and diverse program, which ranges from sober drama to irreverent comedy, includes films from all across Italy, continuing the strong regionalist trend of recent years. With exemplary new work by Gianfranco Rosi and Vincenzo Marra, it also underscores the emergence of documentary as a breeding ground for some of the most exciting developments in contemporary Italian cinema.”

This year’s festival highlights the emergence of exciting works by many documentarians, and explores hybrid combinations of documentaries and fiction, with more than a third of the films focused on the medium with rich and fascinating results. Top prizewinners include Gianfranco Rosi’s Sacro GRA, the first documentary to win the Golden Lion for Best Film at the Venice Film Festival, which explores Rome’s 43.5-mile highway Grande Raccordo Anulare that encircles the city by focusing on absorbing, moving individual portraits that emerge from the areas drivers pass through but never see, to reveal a different side of the bustling city’s inhabitants. Alberto Fasulo’s docudrama debut Tir won the top prize at the Rome Film Festival and follows a former teacher from Bosnia who takes a job driving a tractor trailer (“tir”) through Europe. Combining professional actors and real truck drivers, Fasulo has created a striking film about what life is really like on the road—one that simulates a documentary.

Other documentaries include Vincenzo Marra’s Naples-set The Administrator, which looks at a building administrator’s dealings with his larger-than-life tenants, providing a tough-minded yet affectionate portrait of an Italy mired in crisis. Gianni Amelio’s Happy to Be Different is a moving, enlightening work of oral history of gay life in Italy from the fall of Fascism through the early 1980s.

Several films in this year’s lineup explore the evolution of Italy’s political transformation. including the opening-night selection, Daniele Luchetti’s Those Happy Years, a charming, coming-of-age autobiographical tale of the director’s childhood as a budding filmmaker growing up in Rome in the 1970s during a radical, transformative period in Italy. Giovanni Veronesi’s The Fifth Wheel is a humorous tale that takes audiences on a journey of a half-century of pivotal political events through the eyes of actor and screenwriter Ernesto Fioretti.

Politics and social issues facing Italians also play a role in Gianni Amelio’s A Lonely Hero, starring comedian and actor Antonio Albanese, whose character learns to reinvent and adapt himself to any job as a professional substitute (train conductor, fishmonger, tailor, etc.), as a result of the country’s unstable unemployment crisis. Roberto Andò’s Long Live Freedom is a scathing critique of Italian political dynamics and stars Toni Servillo as a seasoned politician navigating the decline of his party by fleeing to Paris and hiding out at the home of his ex-girlfriend. Renowned TV host and political comedian Pierfrancesco Diliberto wrote, directed, and stars in The Mafia Only Kills in Summer, his feature debut about a young boy and his obsession with the Mafia’s presence in his city… and a beautiful schoolmate who remains his love interest until adulthood. The love story is set against a backdrop of some of Italy’s most tragic past criminal events. Edoardo Winspeare’s Quiet Bliss follows three generations of women who seek refuge in their family’s olive grove after their small textile business collapses and their efforts to revive their lives in the wake of economic catastrophe and the recession.

Open Roads: New Italian Cinema was organized by the Film Society of Lincoln Center together with Istituto Luce-Cinecittà - Filmitalia in collaboration with the Italian Cultural Institute of New York. Special thanks to Antonio Monda, the Alexander Bodini Foundation, and Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò for their generous support.

Thursday, May 22. Pre-sale to members of the Film Society of Lincoln Center begins on Tuesday, May 13. Single screening tickets are $13; $9 for students and seniors (62+); and $8 for Film Society members. See more and play less with a discount package starting at $30; $24 for students and seniors (62+); and $21 for Film Society members. The discount package prices apply with the purchase of tickets to three films or more. Visit FilmLinc.com for more information.

All screenings will be held at the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater, at 165 West 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue. Additional information on the series can be found at: http://www.filmlinc.com/daily/entry/fim-society-of-lincoln-center-open-roads-new-italian-cinema.

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