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Wednesday, January 15, 2014

MOMA & Guggenheim - NYC exhibiting Italian Art through Design & Futurism



There are two fantastic exhibitions on display in January and February in New York City.. The continuing exhibit of Italian Production Designer Dante Ferretti at MOMA.. and a new exhibit opening in February at the Guggenheim, which will present an overview of Italian Futurism. 

Dante Ferretti: Design and Construction for the Cinema
Until February 9, 2014

Dante Ferretti. Ferretti Labyrinth exhibition design. 2013. Mixed media. Courtesy the artist
Since 1969  has served as the production designer on over 50 feature films, 24 opera productions, and over a dozen television, museum, fashion, festival, and publication projects, working with the likes of fashion icon Valentino and directors Liliana Cavani and David Cronenberg, among others. His career-defining work has been done in collaboration with filmmakers Pier Paolo Pasolini, Federico Fellini, and Martin Scorsese. In Italy, North America, and Britain, he has also created designs with directors Luigi Comencini, Marco Ferreri, Elio Petri, Sergio Citti, Mario Camerini, Franco Zefferelli, Ettore Scola, Dino Risi, Marco Bellocchio, Luigi Zampa, Franco Brusati, Luciano Salce, Tim Burton, Brian DePalma, Terry Gilliam, Julie Taymor, Jean-Jacques Annaud, Martin Brest, Neil Jordan, and Anthony Minghella. He has received the Academy Award, the British BAFTA, and the Italian David Di Donatello.

Held in conjunction with the film exhibition Dante Ferretti: Designing for the Big Screen 




Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe


February 21–September 1, 2014



Giacomo Balla, Abstract Speed + Sound (Velocità astratta + rumore), 1913–14. Oil on board, 54.5 x 76.5 cm. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice. Photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome

















The first comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism to be presented in the United States, this multidisciplinary exhibition examines the historical sweep of the movement from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s Futurist manifesto in 1909 through its demise at the end of World War II. Presenting over 300 works executed between 1909 and 1944, the chronological exhibition encompasses not only painting and sculpture, but also architecture, design, ceramics, fashion, film, photography, advertising, free-form poetry, publications, music, theater, and performance. To convey the myriad artistic languages employed by the Futurists as they evolved over a 35-year period, the exhibition integrates multiple disciplines in each section.





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